Mechanical

Loading...
216 017
$699.00 inc. GST
The Farmhand large dehorner is a new development from Shoof. It has been designed to suit the high end of the dehorning market, where strength, reliability and light weight are important. The dehorner is made of cast steel, with Australian hardwood handles. The gear set is precision cast to create the most cutting force with the least handle effort. To aid in this the main pivot points are brass brushed, to reduce moment loads. All parts are available. Blade opening to 80mm. Handles 70cm long. Length 122cm o.a. Weight 10kg.*Blade set includes bolts and screws set.
High quality model from Farmhand™. Fully improved model with new castings and heavy-duty hinge points. This is a higher quality tool with improved cutting efficiency. Quadrant-link mechanism for easiest cutting action. Cupped blades opening to 55mm. All stainless steel. Length 60cm o.a. Weight 2.4kg. Australian hardwood handles.
The small Convex is the ideal dehorner for use on younger stock up to about 15 months, and also for sheep and goats. The cutting action is quick and smooth, leaving a clean stump for healthiest recovery. Blade opening to 45mm. Length 79cm o.a. Weight 2.7kg.
We recommend the large Convex up to mature stock, but where horns are not at maximum growth. The 'parrot beak' jaw can be easier to use than the Keystone style, and the tool is more robust. Maximum blade opening 63mm. Replacement blade available. Handles 70cm long. Length 104cm o.a. Weight 7.5kg.
The best value for money dehorners around. The James Scully Keystone model is suitable up to mature stock, with fully grown horns. Flat-shear V jaws give cleaner cuts with less force required. Eccentric gears on tapered spindle give greatest power at start of stroke, and fastest cut at the end. Blade opening to 90mm. Handles 70cm long. Length 115cm o.a. Weight 8kg.
These three items are from dehorning specialists Keystone Dehorner, USA. They are to reduce fly strike, blood loss and trauma following dehorning of cattle. Small pieces are broken off the fibre pad and pushed into the horn cavity. (The pad should do about 25 horns.) The fibre is then covered with either packing tape or packing paste, to secure the fibre in the horn. The paste is thick and tar-like, with an integrated lid brush. The packing and tape or paste fall off naturally as the horn heals.